BRODMANN AREAS OF THE BRAIN

Left Lateral Surface View

Right Mid-Sagittal View

Source: Mureriwa, JFL (2017) (Reprint). Psychology is Entirely Physical: Taking the Mind out of Behavioural Neuroscience (p. 53). Lambert Academic Publications. International Book Market Service Ltd.

Brodmann Area(s)Some Examples Of Known Or Suspected Functions
1, 2, 3The primary sensori-motor areas. They are responsible for sensation and movement.
4, 5, 6Involved in the planning and execution of movement.
5, 7, 40These are the secondary sensori-motor areas. They are involved in the more complex aspects of the sense of touch. Area 7 is associated with self-evaluation, and orientation of space and time, and shifting attention.
6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 45, 46Frontal and prefrontal areas. They are responsible for the executive functions of the brain. Area 44 is the well- known Broca's Area responsible for speech production (left hemisphere). These areas are involved in calculations.
11, 34, 38, 47Involved with sense of smell.
13, 38Humour appreciation
11, 12, 25, 38They contribute to behavioural inhibition and control
17,18,19Occipital lobes: Receive and process visual information
41, 42, 20, 21, 22These BA’s are involved in receiving and processing auditory information. They are responsible for understanding speech (Wernicke's Area, BA 22) and other language functions and memory.
20,23, 28, 35, 36, 37Memory, language
39, 40BA 39 and 40 represent the overlap between the visual, touch, and auditory cortices. They are also known as association areas or tertiary areas. Some of the behavioural (psychological) functions include capacities for reading, writing, spelling, calculations, and abstract thinking (left hemisphere), and musical abilities (right hemisphere). Together with BA 22 part of Wernicke's Area
25, 38Some researchers suggest that these areas are responsible for moral reasoning
26,27,29,30These Brodmann areas, also known as the parahippocampal areas are responsible for many functions, including memory and emotions.
23, 24, 31, 32, 33These structures are on the cingulate gyrus (anterior and posterior). The functions include attention, memory, behavioural inhibition, persistence, and self-evaluation.

Modified from: Mureriwa, JFL (2017) (Reprint). Psychology is Entirely Physical: Taking the Mind out of Behavioural Neuroscience (p. 54). Lambert Academic Publications. International Book Market Service Ltd.